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Archive for May, 2011|Monthly archive page

Edible Buffalo and Lexington Co-operative Market Announce Food Matters II Film Series

In Uncategorized on May 28, 2011 at 10:48 am

Edible Buffalo and the Lexington Co-operative Market are proud to present their Food Matters II Film Series benefiting Field & Fork Network, a local non-profit organization dedicated to building a thriving regional food system in WNY. All of the screenings will take place at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, 341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202.

The series kicks off on June 8 at 7pm with a screening of The Garden.

The fourteen-acre community garden at 41st and Alameda in South Central Los Angeles was the largest of its kind in the United States. Started as a form of healing after the devastating L.A. riots in 1992, the South Central Farmers created a miracle in one of the country’s most blighted neighborhoods. Growing their own food. Feeding their families. Creating a community.

Then came the threat of bulldozers and the end to their community garden. The Garden follows the plight of the farmers, from the tilled soil of this urban farm to the polished marble of City Hall. Mostly immigrants from Latin America, from countries where they feared for their lives if they were to speak out, we watch them organize, fight back, and demand answers:Why was the land sold to a wealthy developer for millions less than fair-market value? Why was the transaction done in a closed-door session of the LA City Council? Why has it never been made public?

And the powers-that-be have the same response: “The garden is wonderful, but there is nothing more we can do.”

If everyone told you nothing more could be done, would you give up?

The Garden has the pulse of verité with the narrative pull of fiction, telling the story of the country’s largest urban farm, backroom deals, land developers, green politics, money, poverty, power, and racial discord. The film explores and exposes the fault lines in American society and raises crucial and challenging questions about liberty, equality, and justice for the poorest and most vulnerable among us.

Purchase Tickets here.

The next film is Truck Farm, the screening will take place on June 29 at 7pm.

Truck Farm is a whimsical film that follows a 1986 Dodge Ram pick-up with a mini-farm planted in the truck bed. It’s a traveling, edible exhibit that brings a rural experience to urban residents. See what happens with the tiniest farm in America’s biggest city.

Purchase tickets here.

The third installment of the film series, What’s On Your Plate?, takes place on September 14 at 7pm at Hallwalls.

What’s On Your Plate?  is a witty and provocative documentary produced and directed by award-winning Catherine Gund about kids and food politics. Filmed over the course of one year, the film follows two eleven-year-old multi-racial city kids as they explore their place in the food chain. Sadie and Safiyah take a close look at food systems in New York City and its surrounding areas. With the camera as their companion, the girl guides talk to each other, food activists, farmers, new friends, storekeepers, their families, and the viewer, in their quest to understand what’s on all of our plates.

The girls address questions regarding the origin of the food they eat, how it’s cultivated, how many miles it travels from the harvest to their plate, how it’s prepared, who prepares it, and what is done afterwards with the packaging and leftovers. They visit the usual supermarkets, fast food chains, and school lunchrooms. But they also check into innovative sustainable food system practices by going to farms, greenmarkets, and community supported agriculture programs. They discover that these programs both help struggling farmers to survive on the one hand and provide affordable, locally-grown food to communities on the consumer end, especially to lower-income urban families. In WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE?, the two friends formulate sophisticated and compassionate opinions on the state of their society, and by doing so inspire hope and active engagement in others.

Purchase tickets here.

The last installment of the series is Urban Roots.  This screening will be on October 20 at 7pm.

This film follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit. Urban Roots is a timely, moving and inspiring film that speaks to a nation grappling with collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future.

Purchase tickets here.

Edible Buffalo and Edible Communities Publications Win “Publication of the Year” from the James Beard Foundation

In Uncategorized on May 19, 2011 at 11:55 am

Edible Buffalo, Western New York’s only regional food publication, has been awarded the 2011 Publication of the Year Award from the James Beard Foundation, along with the nearly 70 other titles currently publishing within the Edible Communities network of regional food magazines. During the James Beard Journalism Awards dinner held in New York City last Friday evening, Edible Communities co-founders, Tracey Ryder and Carole Topalian, were on hand to accept the award on behalf of all of the Edible magazines.

“We could not be happier or more proud of our publishers than we are right now — they each bring an incredibly high level of quality to their magazines and are experts at knowing all there is to know about their local food communities, says Ryder. They all work very hard to ensure that each issue is full of compelling stories and images and also play an active role in their local food communities. To know that the vote was unanimous and that every member of the Beard Foundation Journalism Awards Committee voted for us is an honor we deeply appreciate.”

Background and information from the James Beard Awards Committee:

This year, the Journalism Committee of the James Beard Foundation Awards has decided for the first time to present a special award for what it deems to be Publication of the Year. The Publication of the Year Award recognizes a publication—in magazine, newspaper, or digital format—that demonstrates fresh directions, worthy ambitions, and a forward-looking approach to food journalism.

The publications produced by the Edible Communities company are “locavores” with national appeal. They are locally grown and community based, like the foods, family farmers, growers, retailers, chefs, and food artisans they feature. The company’s unique publishing model addresses the most crucial trends in food journalism; the publications are rooted in distinct culinary regions throughout the United States and Canada, celebrating local, seasonal foods with the goal of transforming the way we shop, cook, and eat. Their underlying values speak to today’s spirit of shared responsibility: every person has the right to affordable, fresh, healthful food on a daily basis.

Through the vision of its co-founders, Tracey Ryder and Carole Topalian, Edible Communities began in 2002 with a single publication, Edible Ojai, in their California hometown. Maintaining consistent standards of excellence, the network has grown to 70 publications in 2011. Edible Communities’ regional journalists and publishers are local foods advocates who write with a community voice, reside in the communities where they publish, and savor the culinary products produced there.
Edible Communities is more than a group of high-quality, regional print magazines with compelling storytelling and visual narratives. Through electronic and digital platforms—websites, social media, Edible Radio podcasts, and popular local events—its food journalism carries regional stories to national and global audiences. We believe that in years to come the collected work of these unique publications will serve as a valuable resource for exploring the impact of regional food and agriculture from a grassroots perspective.

At a time when journalists are reinventing traditional publications and embracing digital formats, the Journalism Committee of the James Beard Foundation is proud to recognize Edible Communities for this first-ever award. Edible Communities’ body of work reflects excellence in the ever-changing world of food journalism. Its publications inform and connect today’s food-savvy readers with local communities that stand for a healthful, flavorful, and sustainable food supply.

— The Journalism Awards Committee

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