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Posts Tagged ‘local food’

An Update From O’Brien’s Smokehouse & Bistro

In Uncategorized on October 10, 2012 at 3:50 pm

Beef from O’Brien’s Smokehouse. PHOTO/ Edible Buffalo

We’ve heard from some of our readers who were disappointed to learn that O’Brien’s Smokehouse & Bistro in Hamburg had closed at the time of our Fall 2012 issue coming out.  The good news is that the O’Brien’s are still planning on offering many of the same products they had at the smokehouse at their pub location in the village of Eden. They are currently going through a consolidation phase of combining the two businesses. They sent us this update yesterday:

We are still in the process of consolidating!

Starting October 18, the Pub will be open every Thursday from 10am-4pm for customers to pick up their orders. We will publish on Mondays, a weekly price sheet on our website and in an e-mail newsletter stating what products we have available and their prices. Customers can then either call us at 716-646-6328  or e-mail their orders to us at obrienssmokehouse@gmail.com  and we will have them ready on Thursdays.   We will continue to expand our product line as we complete our consolidation.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

So please bear with them as they go through this change in business structure, I promise it will be worth the wait!

Food and Wine- Well-Crafted

In Uncategorized on October 8, 2012 at 4:43 pm

PHOTO/ Carole Topalian

According to Elbert Hubbard “Art is not a thing, it is a way,” and during the upcoming Roycroft Arts and Crafts Conference that will be exemplified through two food and wine events.  Both the “Well Crafted” Wine Tasting and Dinner will highlight unique ingredients from their origins and creation to preparation and how we indulge.

Opening the weekend events on Thursday October 18th will be “A Well Crafted Wine Tasting.” It will be held at The Roycroft Power House and will feature a variety of wines that are not your typical pinot grigio or cabernet.    The wines highlighted will include uncommon varietals and blends and countries of origin from Africa to New Zealand. Accompanying the wines will be a tasting of olive oils from around the world.  The cost per person is $30.

On Saturday October 20th, the “Well Crafted Dinner” will highlight the ideas of self-sustainable, environmentally-friendly and organic food sources.  The evening will include special presentations by Robin Ross of Arrowhead Spring Vineyards who will discuss their  environmental philosophy on grape growing to produce a world class wine. Trystan Sandvoss, Founder of First Light Farm, will explain their approach and philosophy in making their artisanal cheese and dairy products.  Completing the conversation will by Mary Jo Graham, Environmentalist and Naturalist, who will share the concepts of self-sustainable, environmentally-friendly and organic food sources.  The meal will be specially prepared from locally harvested fruits and vegetables, and free range chicken. It will surely be a relaxing and informative evening while enjoying a meal the way food was meant to be made, the well-crafted way. The cost person is $45.

As part of East Aurora’s “Well Crafted Weekend” there will be many food and wines events through the village including the East Aurora Farmers market on Saturday 9am-1 pm, fresh baked artisan breads at the Elm St. bakery and at the East Aurora Food Cooperative Market you can learn more about co-op markets and how to support our local producers.  And, let’s not forget, it’s Local Restaurant Week with EA restaurants offering specials at $20.12.

For more information on the “Well Crafted” Wine Tasting and Dinner and the Roycroft Campus Arts and Crafts Conference or to make a reservation, visit their RCC website at www.roycroftcampuscorporation.com  or call The Copper Shop Gallery at 716.655.0261.

The Conference is sponsored by Style 1900, Boston Valley Terra Cotta and Jaeckle, Fleischmann & Mugel.  The Roycroft Conference events can be purchased separately or as a package.  Accommodations for overnight guest are available at The Roycroft Inn.

Post courtesy of the Roycroft Campus Corporation

Lake Effect Ice Cream Rolls Out Cool New Smartphone App

In Uncategorized on August 13, 2012 at 5:56 pm

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Western New York’s Lake Effect Artisan Ice Cream is well known for unconventional and original ice cream (honeyed fig and chèvre, anyone?) so it’s no surprise that their latest project is just as unique as the flavors they serve up in downtown Lockport. Lake Effect owners Jason Wulf and Erik Bernardi teamed up with local business Quinlan and Company to create a iPhone application so users can get their digital fix of Lake Effect Ice Cream anytime, anyplace. We spoke with Jason about the app to get the scoop on the sweet new app.

How did you guys come up with the idea for the app?

Actually it was kind of thrown around at a meeting we had with Ryan DiMillo. Ryan is a past student of mine and now the VP of operations at Quinlan and Company. We were meeting to put our heads together to streamline our online presence and establish a new website (which is in the works).

Who designed the app?

Ryan and his team at Quinlan built the app. We worked with his team to come up with the design and, more importantly, the purpose of the app. They were excellent to work with.

So, why does an ice cream shop need a smartphone app?

The app addressed all of our biggest communication issues.

  • It’s a location finder so everyone knows where they can get their next Lake Effect Fix, no matter where they are.
  • It gives people a jump off point to all of our social media sites, making it easier for people to get information about us.
  • It is an ongoing flavor library, complete with descriptions, ingredients and allergen answers.
  • It gave us a direct feedback link to our customers.
  • It’s awesome!

What’s the coolest feature about the app?

The coolest feature has to be the “Lake Effect Yeti” feature. This will allow us to pick a point and time to place one of us somewhere in WNY to hand out new flavors, t-shirts etc… It’s a really cool take on a digital scavenger hunt. The potential uses of it are endless.

Are there any plans to add more features? Will there be an Android version of the app?

We are always thinking of ways to improve it but are working on adding all the data we need to first. We built our whole company on the idea of starting small, mastering that step and then moving on. The app is thought of the same way.

Currently we are working on finishing our web page. When that is finished we will move on to the android version. I’m an old school Apple user and borderline Apple Evangelist. I love the fact that when I look at my iPhone I get to see our app sitting there on my first screen.

How popular has it been so far?

We are really excited at how many people have downloaded it and are using it! The whole idea was to make it useful and fun at the same time. We hope it does that.

You can download the app in the iTunes store here, or download it directly onto your iPhone or iPod touch. For more information on Lake Effect Ice Cream you can visit their website at http://lakeeffecticecream.blogspot.com/.

Summer Harvest Frittata- A Guest Post From Tasty Yummies

In Uncategorized on August 6, 2012 at 5:56 pm

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

Excerpt from tasty-yummies.com

I am seriously in love with my CSA from Porter Farms. It is so cost effective, the produce is all organic (and obviously local) and each week there are new surprised in the bag that I get excited about playing with.

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

I am sure most of you do know, but if you don’t know what a CSA is, here is a quick description from the Porter Farms website:

CSA stands for “community-supported agriculture”. The idea behind it is simple: individuals share the costs, risks and bounty of growing food in an environmentally-friendly fashion. The concept first appeared in the U.S. in the early 80’s, when people sought higher quality foods available from local sources.

The meaning of “community-supported agriculture” as it relates to the mission of our program here at Porter Farms is as follows: CSA participants, through their membership, help pay for seeds, compost, irrigation supplies, equipment maintenance, fuel, labor, etc. In return, the farm provides, to the best of its ability, 22 weeks of fresh, certified organic produce throughout the growing season.

Community supported agriculture is a grassroots movement that reconnects the local community with its food source, the local farmer. This alternative to the grocery store and big chains couldn’t fit more perfectly into my lifestyle and my mindset. My only complaint about CSAs is that I didn’t join one sooner! This most definitely will be a yearly thing for us.

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

Each week I try to get creative with the offerings in my bag, playing around with new recipes, getting inspired. This week we received zucchini, yellow squash, cucumbers, celery, red and golden beets, tomato berries and red onions with their tops. So many things that I love! I wanted to play around with a dish that would really highlight as many of the ingredients as I could. I did pretty well, the only two that didn’t make it into this dish were the beets and the cucumbers and don’t worry I have big plans for both of those.

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

In addition to the CSA, each Saturday morning, I always pick up a dozen (or two) brown eggs from Painted Meadows Farm at the Elmwood Bidwell Farmers Market. I am telling you, until you have had eggs fresh from a farm (or maybe you have my ultimate dream and you have your own chicken in the yard), you have no clue what you are missing. The taste isn’t even comparable, the yolks are a shade of yellowy, orange you wouldn’t believe. Now I am spoiled, it’s the only kind of eggs I want to eat.

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

In looking over our pantry and refrigerator and all of these lovely, seasonal ingredients, I had the perfect thought for a light summertime dinner – a Summer Harvest Frittata. What a great way to highlight all the wonderful items in season right now.This recipe is quite versatile so feel free to play around with it and add or take away anything you’d like or have on hand from your own CSA, farmers market or your garden. I added a bunch of fresh basil since it is growing abundantly and beautifully in our yard, but the flavor profile can easily change to whatever fresh herb or spice you have readily available. This frittata was perfectly satisfying for dinner with a small salad on the side, but it would also be great for breakfast, brunch or heck even lunch, you can eat it all day!

Summer Harvest Frittata - Gluten-free + Dairy-free

Summer Harvest Frittata – Gluten-free + Dairy-free
Ingredients

  • 6-8 large local farm fresh brown eggs (more eggs will give you a fluffier thicker frittata, less eggs and it will be thinner)
  • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium zucchini, cut in half-length wise, then cut in half again (if it is large enough) and sliced
  • 1 medium yellow squash, cut in half length wise, then cut in half again (if it is large enough) and sliced
  • 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved or quartered depending on what size they are
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400ºF.

In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs with a small pinch of salt, red pepper flakes and basil. Set aside.
In a 8 to 9 inch oven-safe, cast iron skillet, heat olive oil over a medium-high heat, make sure you get the olive oil all up the sides using a brush or some wax paper, etc. (you can also use an oven-safe nonstick skillet). Add the onion and celery, with a dash of sea salt, sauté about 3-5 minutes until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté another 2 minutes, being careful not to burn it. Add the zucchini and squash, toss around and sauté about 8-10 minutes, until they are tender. Add the tomatoes and cook for another 2-3 minutes until the tomatoes start to soften and get tender. If there is any water sitting in the pan from the veggies, pour it off. Salt and pepper to taste.

Turn down the heat a bit. Add the egg mixture to the skillet by pouring over the veggies and giving it all a really quick stir to combine. Cook over a medium-low heat for about 5 minutes or until the eggs are just set and there isn’t a lot of liquid running around the pan. To do this, run a spatula underneath the sides of the frittata and tilt the pan so the uncooked eggs run to the underside and cook.

Place the skillet in the center of your preheated oven. Allow to bake for 13-15 minutes, until it is golden brown, well set and puffy. Remove from oven with oven mitts and let cool for several minutes, cut into wedges and serve.

Post, photos and recipe courtesy of Beth Manos-Brickey of Tasty Yummies. You can find the original post and many more delicious seasonal recipes at tasty-yummies.com.

Butternut Squash and Roasted Red Pepper Soup- A Recipe From Tasty Yummies

In Uncategorized on February 11, 2012 at 2:49 pm

Courtesy of Tasty Yummies

Excerpt from tasty-yummies.com

I am super excited about how this soup turned out. This soup actually made me realize what a dork I am about good healthy food. It actually makes me stupid excited and I wanna dance around my kitchen! I love when you have an idea in your mind for a dish, you start experimenting, tasting and playing around and it just all falls perfectly into place. That happened with this soup. In fact, it actually came out better than I had imagined it would.

I topped this soup with a roasted red pepper puree that was inspired by a recipe I came across from Bon Appetit magazine in 2003 and I also drizzled some roasted butternut squash seed oil over top. I realize this oil is a very specialized product, and many of you may not have access to it, so you could certainly just use a good quality extra virgin olive oil, or just skip it altogether. The butternut squash seed oil that I have is from a company based in the Finger Lakes region of NY called Stony Brook Oils, I picked it up at Farmers and Artisans here in Buffalo. You can visit Stony Brook’s web site to get a listing of all of the stores you can buy their various squash seed oils at or you can even buy them online. Honestly, if you ever get a chance to try a pumpkin or a squash seed oil, do it. The flavors are incredible. It brings a unique nutty and roasted flavor to so many different dishes. I have never tasted anything like it.

I happened to be able to get my hands on some beautiful red bell peppers that I roasted on my stove top to use in this soup and for the puree on top. If the red peppers at your market aren’t looking so hot, just go with jarred roasted red peppers, they will work perfectly fine, too.

This naturally gluten-free and vegan soup is bursting with flavors and it is so beautiful and colorful. The roasted red peppers in the soup compliment the nutty flavor of the squash and the spicy, garlicky puree on top is a nice burst of bright flavor with a hint of spiciness. The puree was so delicious that I have been using it as a spread on sandwiches and on top of freshly steamed vegetables, etc. I feel like I always need to have a batch of this stuff on hand.

Courtesy of Tasty Yummies

Butternut Squash and Roasted Red Pepper Soup

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large butternut squash (about 2 to 2 1/2 lbs), peeled, seeded and cubed
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 roasted red peppers, diced (here is a great page of different options on how you can roast your own red peppers at home, I roasted mine on my stove top)
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 tsp of crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 7 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  • butternut squash seed oil (or olive oil) for drizzling

Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add onions, celery and butternut squash and sauté until the onions and celery are tender, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and roasted red peppers; stir 1-2 minutes. Add thyme, salt and vegetable broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until squash is soft, about 45 minutes.

Purée with an immersion blender or in batches using a regular blender or food processor*, until smooth. Return puree to pot. Thin soup with more broth if desired. Ladle soup into bowls. Top each bowl with 1 tablespoon of the roasted red pepper purée and a light drizzle of butternut squash seed oil. Sprinkle with a pinch of fresh thyme.

* When puréeing hot soup in a blender or food processor, do so in small batches, filling the blender pitcher only about halfway. Put the lid on, but remove that small cap in the lid (if you have it) and hold the lid down tight with a towel, otherwise the steam will cause the lid to explode off, spewing hot liquid everywhere. This has never happened to me, but it can, so be careful.

Roasted Red Pepper Puree
via Bon Appetit Magazine, November 2003

Ingredients

 

  • 2 roasted red peppers (approximately 1 cup)
  • 2-3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

Puree all ingredients in processor until smooth. Season with salt and pepper.

Post, photos and recipe courtesy of Beth Manos-Brickey of Tasty Yummies. You can find the original post and many more delicious seasonal recipes at tasty-yummies.com.

Edible Buffalo and Lexington Co-operative Market Announce Food Matters II Film Series

In Uncategorized on May 28, 2011 at 10:48 am

Edible Buffalo and the Lexington Co-operative Market are proud to present their Food Matters II Film Series benefiting Field & Fork Network, a local non-profit organization dedicated to building a thriving regional food system in WNY. All of the screenings will take place at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, 341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202.

The series kicks off on June 8 at 7pm with a screening of The Garden.

The fourteen-acre community garden at 41st and Alameda in South Central Los Angeles was the largest of its kind in the United States. Started as a form of healing after the devastating L.A. riots in 1992, the South Central Farmers created a miracle in one of the country’s most blighted neighborhoods. Growing their own food. Feeding their families. Creating a community.

Then came the threat of bulldozers and the end to their community garden. The Garden follows the plight of the farmers, from the tilled soil of this urban farm to the polished marble of City Hall. Mostly immigrants from Latin America, from countries where they feared for their lives if they were to speak out, we watch them organize, fight back, and demand answers:Why was the land sold to a wealthy developer for millions less than fair-market value? Why was the transaction done in a closed-door session of the LA City Council? Why has it never been made public?

And the powers-that-be have the same response: “The garden is wonderful, but there is nothing more we can do.”

If everyone told you nothing more could be done, would you give up?

The Garden has the pulse of verité with the narrative pull of fiction, telling the story of the country’s largest urban farm, backroom deals, land developers, green politics, money, poverty, power, and racial discord. The film explores and exposes the fault lines in American society and raises crucial and challenging questions about liberty, equality, and justice for the poorest and most vulnerable among us.

Purchase Tickets here.

The next film is Truck Farm, the screening will take place on June 29 at 7pm.

Truck Farm is a whimsical film that follows a 1986 Dodge Ram pick-up with a mini-farm planted in the truck bed. It’s a traveling, edible exhibit that brings a rural experience to urban residents. See what happens with the tiniest farm in America’s biggest city.

Purchase tickets here.

The third installment of the film series, What’s On Your Plate?, takes place on September 14 at 7pm at Hallwalls.

What’s On Your Plate?  is a witty and provocative documentary produced and directed by award-winning Catherine Gund about kids and food politics. Filmed over the course of one year, the film follows two eleven-year-old multi-racial city kids as they explore their place in the food chain. Sadie and Safiyah take a close look at food systems in New York City and its surrounding areas. With the camera as their companion, the girl guides talk to each other, food activists, farmers, new friends, storekeepers, their families, and the viewer, in their quest to understand what’s on all of our plates.

The girls address questions regarding the origin of the food they eat, how it’s cultivated, how many miles it travels from the harvest to their plate, how it’s prepared, who prepares it, and what is done afterwards with the packaging and leftovers. They visit the usual supermarkets, fast food chains, and school lunchrooms. But they also check into innovative sustainable food system practices by going to farms, greenmarkets, and community supported agriculture programs. They discover that these programs both help struggling farmers to survive on the one hand and provide affordable, locally-grown food to communities on the consumer end, especially to lower-income urban families. In WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE?, the two friends formulate sophisticated and compassionate opinions on the state of their society, and by doing so inspire hope and active engagement in others.

Purchase tickets here.

The last installment of the series is Urban Roots.  This screening will be on October 20 at 7pm.

This film follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit. Urban Roots is a timely, moving and inspiring film that speaks to a nation grappling with collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future.

Purchase tickets here.

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